Video

Allows altering the basic video settings from that of the Standard preset if necessary.




Basic Video Settings


- Video Encoder:
Uses the x264 Encoder.
When the proper environment is available, this setting allows you to select the [Intel Media SDK (Hardware)].
* Usable settings depend on the selected encoder.


- Profile:
The Profile allows you to select between [Baseline], [Main], [High], [High 4:2:2], [High 4:4:4 Predicative], [High 10 Intra], [High 4:2:2 Intra] or [High 4:4:4 Intra].
The Baseline Profile is mainly for mobile device content encoding. The Main and High profiles allow advanced parameters such as CABAC and are mainly used for standard or high definition videos.
* In the Baseline profile, interlaced output is not allowed.
* When the Intel Media SDK Hardware encoder is set, the [Baseline], [Main] and [High] are available.


- Level:
The level is selectable between [Auto] and [1] to [6.2].
When set to Auto, a suitable level will be set automatically based on the other settings.
* Available settings are different depending on the selected video encoder.
* Level 4.2 and above, interlaced output is not allowed.
* When the Intel Media SDK Hardware encoder is set, the level is selectable between [High] and up to [5.2] .


- Width:, Height:
Sets the output width and height of the video picture in pixels.
The admissible values depend on the selected Profile & Level option.
* The value of the vertical resolution requires a multiple of 4 or multiple of 2. When the value is multiple of 2, interlaced output is not allowed. While it is possible to encode a picture larger than 1920 ~ 1080 (e.g., Level5.1 4096 x 2304 29.97fps), such a size requires a tremendous amount of memory to encode. This increases the risk of having insufficient memory errors occurring while encoding the project. We recommend you set the image size within the Full High Definition size.
* Available settings are different depending on the selected video encoder.


- Aspect Ratio:
Sets the output video aspect ratio.
When the display aspect ratio is selected, the outputted video will be played using the selected display aspect ratio regardless of the actual horizontal and vertical sizes. When the pixel aspect ratio is selected, the outputted video will be played using the specified horizontal and vertical sizes in square pixels.
* Available settings are different depending on the selected video encoder.


- Framerate:
Sets the number of frames displayed per second.
The admissible values depend on the selected Profile & Level and size option.


- Entropy Coding :
Sets the encoder coding mode.
CAVLC Context-Adaptive Variable-Length Coding. A less efficient method of compression compared to CABAC, but requires less processing power, making it suited for low-spec decoders such as those found in mobile devices.
CABAC Context-Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding. While this is the most efficient compression method available, it requires a tremendous amount of processing, both for encoding and decoding. Hence, this method is limited to Main and High profiles.


- Display Mode
Please select a type which applies to the output setting of the current Adobe Premiere Pro CC project. The plug-in has no capability of de-interlacing automatically.
Progressive Encodes in progressive mode (1 frame from video renders a complete picture on the display output).
Interlaced Encodes in interlace mode (a mode used in TV broadcasting). When displayed on a computer monitor, horizontal scanlines may appear.
3:2 Pulldown Playback Used when 23.976 (24) fps video (anime, movies, etc.) is encoded as 29.97 fps video. Sets a flag indicating the player should apply 3:2 pulldown video processing during playback.
Progressive
(2:2 Pulldown)

Encodes at 29.97 fps in progressive mode, and sets a flag indicating the player should double the framerate at 60i to increase the encode efficiency. This option is only for 29.97 fps setting.

* Available settings are different depending on the selected video encoder.


- High-Precision Deinterlace
When processing deinterlacing, this option reduces jaggies and flickering pixels with higher accuracy by analyzing the previous and following picture's characteristics in quite some detail and then interpolating the interlaced pixel parts.


- Field Order
Sets the image field display order when the "Display Mode" is set to "Interlaced".
This setting is available for Interlace display mode, and specifies which of the top or bottom fields is displayed first. Most players expect a top field first order, however some may require a bottom field first order. Refer to the player's requirements before changing this option.


- Performance
Selects the encoder performance presets.
With the Performance setting, increasing the picture quality priority level leads to a more detailed and precise analysis of the original picture, and makes the encoding engine's internal settings finer, resulting in an elevated picture quality. However, as the precision increases, the output speed decreases. Inversely, prioritizing the speed lowers the precision for the picture quality.
Available settings: Fastest, High speed, Fast, Somewhat fast, Normal, Somewhat slow, Slow, Very slow.
* When you set a different value than the preset in the Advanced Settings, the setting of the Performance displays [Custom].


Bitrate Settings



- Rate Control Mode
CBR (Constant Bitrate)
Encodes the entire video keeping the bitrate as close as possible to the average video bitrate setting. In some cases, the bitrate may not be constant depending on the video encoder or source files.
* There is no 2-Pass setting.

VBR (Average Bitrate)
Encodes the video targeting the average bitrate, keeping the bitrate within the Bitrate and Minimum Bitrate. VBR bitrate control mode optimizes the bitrate allocation depending on the picture's characteristics.
* In the x264 encoder, the pass count can be specified.

VBR (Constant Quality)
Encodes the video, referencing the target image Quality value. The closer the Quality setting to 100, the better the outputted picture quality. Setting the Maximum Bitrate too low makes it difficult for the encoder to attain the desired quality, hence you have to set the picture Quality and Maximum Bitrate values depending on the image characteristics. This mode allows the setting of the maximum bitrate, but since the actual bitrate can vary widely depending on the image characteristics, it is not possible to estimate the outputted file size.
* Available only in the x264 encoder.

VBR (Average Bitrate) Non-VBV
Prrovides a high bitrate to the motion areas automatically. Inversely provides a low bitrate to the flat areas. The average bitrate can be set in the [Bitrate] field. Since this option does not set the VBV, the maximum bitrate becomes unlimited. For this reason, the output file size tends to be large.
* Available only in the Intel Media SDK Hardware encoder.

VBR (Constant Quality) Non-VBV
Encodes the video, referencing the target image quality value. The quality value can be set in the [Quality] field. The closer the quality setting to 100 from the standard 50, the better the outputted picture quality. Setting the Maximum Bitrate too low makes it difficult for the encoder to attain the desired quality, hence you have to set the picture quality and Maximum Bitrate values depending on the image characteristics. Since this option does not set the VBV, the maximum bitrate becomes unlimited. For this reason, the output file size tends to be large.
* Available only in the Intel Media SDK Hardware encoder.

VBR (Constant Quantization) Non-VBV
Encodes by using the fixed quantization coefficients set for each I, P and B frames instead of specifying the bitrate. When this option is set, you can set the values for each frames at the [QP] settings. Since this option does not set the VBV, the maximum bitrate becomes unlimited. For this reason, the output file size tends to be large. Because of this option's characteristics, there is a possibility that the bitrate of the output file does not keep the restrictions of the specified profile and level.
* Available only in the Intel Media SDK Hardware encoder.


- Pass Count
This setting is available in [VBR (Average bitrate)]
* The Intel Media SDK Hardware cannot encode in VBR 2 pass.
1 Pass (VBR)
Encodes by targeting a bitrate between the Average bitrate and Maximum bitrate.
Compared to the 2 pass VBR mode, the 1 pass mode can end up further from the target output size. If you need to keep the output file size closer to a given target size, use the 2 pass mode instead.

2 Pass (VBR)
2 Pass (VBR) Proceeds by analyzing the picture's characteristics during a first pass, then, depending on the detected characteristics, actually encodes the picture by allocating the lowest possible bitrate during a second pass. Compared to CBR at the same bitrate setting, VBR usually allows a smaller file size and/or better picture quality output but requires longer processing time. This mode also allows better output size targeting and is recommended when the output size is constrained such as for the DVD or BD formats.


-Bitrate
Sets the data size for every 1 second of the output video. Larger bitrate values make the output size larger.


- VBV Buffer Size
Sets the size of the Video Buffer Verifier (CPB) used to simulate the behavior of a model decoder.
The default value is set as 0 (Automatic). When setting a size of 0 (Automatic), the actual VBV size is automatically calculated according to the video and bitrate characteristics. If you change the value, please set a suitable value for the device specification to playback.
* If it is not set in an appropriate value, there is a possibility that a device cannot play it, or encoding will require more time.


GOP Structure Settings

Specifies the MPEG data unit's GOP internal structure. GOP, or Group Of Pictures, is structured around I, P, and B frames, where an I frame is stand-alone and contains its entirely own description, and P and B frames are constructed on the difference between the I frame and themselves. Since the GOP is not only related to the picture quality or bitrate, but also strongly attached to the playback compatibility, you should exercise caution when editing its structure.




- Maximum Number of Reference Frames
Sets the maximum number of frames a P or B frame can reference to.
When using a B frame, the maximum number of reference frames must be greater than 1. By increasing the number of reference frames, you can improve the compression efficiency and output image quality. However, you also increase the memory usage during the encoding process, increase the encoding time, and may generate a file presenting compatibility issues with the player.
* When setting the value to "0", the value will be determined automatically.


- Normal Number of Frames in GOP
Specifies the number of frames in a GOP. The number of P frames is automatically calculated by using this value and the Number of B Frames in GOP value. Usually, low bitrate streams use a long GOP.
* Cannot set a value higher than that of the Maximum Number of Frames in GOP.


- Minimum Number of Frames in GOP
Sets the minimum number of frames, all frame types, a GOP should contain. By setting a minimum number of frames per GOP, you can reduce the occurrence of I frames and improve the compression efficiency. When a scene change occurs within the minimum length of a GOP, an I frame is encoded where such changes take place. However, this I frame is not an IDR (Instantaneous Decoding Refresh), hence it does not start a new GOP. Since the P and B frame types cannot reference past the IDR frame, it is possible to improve the compression efficiency during scene changes or other situations.
* Cannot set a value other than that of the Normal Number of Frames in GOP.
* When set to "0" (Automatic), and the "VBV buffer size" setting is "0" (Automatic), the minimum number of frames is the lowest possible tenth of the "Normal Number of Frames in GOP" or the lowest possible "Framerate" setting.


- Number of B Frames in GOP

Specifies the maximum number of B frames within a GOP between [0] to [16].
When set to "0", the encoder outputs only I frames. An I Frame only structure is for compressing data with very little motion; because there are no B frames, high-motion data compression efficiency is low, and the picture quality and bitrate do not match anymore.
* There is a possibility that a device cannot play a video which contains a lot of B frames in a GOP.



- Output bitstream for editing (Closed GOP)
Closes each GOP, removing the link between the previous, current, and next GOPs. Closing a GOP makes the MPEG video file easier to edit afterward but also reduces the compression efficiency.
* When [MP4] is set in the [Stream Format:], this option is always enabled.
* This option is available only in the x264 encoder.


- Detect scene change
When enabled, activates the scene change detection.
By detecting scene changes, you can improve the picture quality. When applied to a dynamic source where scene changes are numerous and the bitrate is set to a low level, the image quality may decrease. Since a scene change starts the generation of a new GOP, do not use this option when the player requires a fixed GOP length.